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Alba Botanica

Alba Botanica
  • Vegan
  • Leaping Bunny Certified
  • Non-Cruelty Free Parent Company
  • Sephora
  • Ulta
  • Amazon

Alba Botanica is Cruelty-free

Is Alba Botanica cruelty-free? Yes! Does Alba Botanica test on animals? No! Alba Botanica is a cruelty-free skin care and hair care company.

About Alba Botanica

Alba Botanica® is grounded in compassion and the ethical treatment of all living things. We look out for our furry friends by ensuring that none of our products, or any of the ingredients in them, are tested on animals. The Leaping Bunny logo is an internationally recognized symbol for cruelty-free cosmetics, personal care, and household products. In 1996, eight national animal protection groups banded together to form The Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics (CCIC). This organization created and administers the Leaping Bunny Program. All Alba Botanica® products are registered under this program. So when you see the little Leaping Bunny symbol on our labels, you know that no animal testing is used in any phase of product development by our company, our laboratories, or our suppliers. Join us in supporting a compassionate and cruelty-free way of life.

We love our friends, including the furry kind. That’s why we never test our products or any of the ingredients in them on animals. Our products contain no meat or by-products of animal killing. We also exclude all cruelly obtained animal ingredients, even if the animal isn’t killed. We limit our use of animal products to ingredients that have been deposited by animals and are of no future benefit to them, such as beeswax.

Did you know that up to 14,000 tons of sunscreen wash off swimmers, scuba divers, and snorkelers into coral reef environments each year? That’s a BIG problem because common chemical sunscreen ingredients such as Oxybenzone (Benzophenone-3, BP-3), Butylparaben and Octinoxate (Ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate) can bleach and seriously damage coral reefs. (*Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. October 2015.)

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